Playing Lean Australia

 

Last year, 2016, I toured Australia for 30 days giving a bunch of Playing Lean workshops. During that time I received a lot of inquiries on how does one become a Playing Lean Facilitator. The answer is simple — by attending Playing Lean Facilitator Training and becoming a member of Playing Lean Facilitator Club! Now, if you live in Australia that means you’d pay more for the airfare and accomodation than for the training itself, and although that investment would pay itself off very soon, Playing Lean decided to organise three facilitator trainings in Australia.

Deciphering Academic Papers

Quiet frontier.

Academic papers hold a lot of knowledge but you shouldn’t trust them blindy. You need to know the difference between a hypothesis and a theory, watch out for selection bias, avoid confusing correlation with causation, and much more.

Reading…

Lean Product and Process Development (2nd Edition).

For the past few weeks I’ve been reading the Lean Product and Process Development (2nd Edition) book by Allen C. Ward and Durward K. Sobek II. It’s very idea heavy, with practically every chapter introducing new concepts. Second edition has several great case studies which really help with understanding how some of the concepts can be used in practice. All in all, this is a book I’ll be re-reading for years to come.

On Continuous Improvement

Continuous Improvement

During the Second World War, U.S. government initiated an improvement programme “Training Within Industry” with aims of providing education regarding the importance of continuous improvement (CI). After the war, CI was taught to post-war Japan through works of Deming and Juran (Shingo and Robinson, 1990). Based on those lectures, Japanese developed their own way of CI thinking, nowadays known as kaizen (Imai, 1986).